Homeless crocs to be killed under Qld plan

Crocodiles that can't be found new homes under Queensland's croc removal scheme will be killed.

Environment Minister Andrew Powell said in June that all reptiles removed from waterways in the state's north under croc management plans would be sent to farms or zoos.

However, a spokeswoman from Mr Powell's office said on Friday that if new homes can't be found for any of the crocs they will have to be euthanised.

"Crocodiles are euthanised as an absolute last resort in the event they cannot be relocated to a farm or zoo," the spokeswoman told AAP.

She says this is long-standing policy also implemented by the previous Labor government.

North Queensland Crocodile Protection Society spokesman Shane Neale labelled the practise "disgusting".

"All of a sudden they've done a back-flip saying they will be [killing some of the crocs]," he said.

"They've been lying to us all along."

He says the group has been saying for some time that zoos and farms will soon reach capacity.

Mr Neal agrees that aggressive crocs should be removed, but says removing all crocs is pointless and gives people a false sense of security.

Under the croc removal scheme, large crocs considered a threat to people in Townsville, Hinchinbrook and along the Cassowary Coast are relocated.

The plan has been extended in Cairns to include removing all crocs, regardless of size, from croc-infested waterways in the Cairns region.

This year, 32 crocs have been captured, half of which came from the Cairns area.

All crocs have so far been relocated to farms or zoos.

In June, environmentalist Bob Irwin slammed the scheme, saying crocs would be turned into expensive handbags and used for meat once relocated to farms.

He said crocs should be released elsewhere in the wild, not put into captivity.

At the time, Mr Powell's office would not say if any of the animals ultimately end up being used for fashion accessories or meat.

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